Symbolism
Honey bees, signifying immortality and resurrection, were royal emblems of the Merovingians, revived by Napoleon. The bee is also the heraldic emblem of the Barberini. In heraldry, the bee symbolizes diligence and indefatigable effort. Someone is said to be busy as a bee when he or she works tirelessly and regardless of schedules or breaks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bee_(mythology)
Napoleon and Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson Portrait by Kehinde Wiley (2009)

Wiley’s studio was in the process of making arrangements for a formal sitting when they received news that the singer had died on 25 June; Wiley never received Jackson’s selection of imagery. The portrait is a compilation of six paintings, including works by David and Rubens

(2009) This year’s Art Basel Miami Beach features myriad homages to the deceased King of Pop, including works by David LaChappelle, Jeff Sonhouse and Jonathan Monk. By far, the most powerful piece on display is a semi-commissioned work by renowned Brooklyn artist Kehinde Wiley at Deitch’s booth. The massive Rubens-inspired oil, called “Equestrian Portrait of King Philip II,” swaps out the Spanish monarch’s face for Michael Jackson’s. The story behind the 2009 painting is as legendary as any tale in Jackson’s book.

As it goes, after seeing Wiley’s work at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Jackson contacted the artist for a commission. Jackson, who frequently had himself painted as a king made a natural match for Wiley’s magical-realism depictions. After Jackson and Wiley spoke for nearly a half-an-hour over the phone in 2008 about the artistic vision behind the piece, they agreed that Wiley would photograph Jackson in an Old Masters pose. Thoroughly impressed with Jackson’s knowledge of the painting process, Wiley sent Jackson a set of reference images but then stopped hearing from him and was unable to contact him after Jackson changed his hotel several times.

Following the star’s death, Wiley decided to complete the piece, a large royal sprawl as majestic as the King’s work himself. Choosing to paint Jackson at the peak of his career, the images shows a figure comfortable in his own body, confident behind a wall of armor atop a bowing horse. With bold blues and reds, and surrounded by heavenly cherubs, it’s a portrait that would have made the King of Pop proud. Miami visitors, this is a must-see before it falls to the home of a private collector.

http://www.coolhunting.com/culture/kehinde-wiley-e.php

Michael’s Dangerous album cover seems to place importance on both of these symbolic colors.

The creator of Michael Jackson dangerous album cover was the artist Mark Ryden. It took six months to end in. Much of the life of Michael Jackson is reflected in it both in pictures as symbols. This artist was born on 20 January 1963, in Medford, Oregon, California. In 1987 he received the School of Design in Pasadena. Among his clients include Stephen King, Leonardo DiCaprio, Robert De Niro, etc … Michael Ryden hired because this is a fan of circus posters from the early last century, and had the mentality to interpret the images they wanted Jackson on the cover. Account cartoonist Michael asked very specific things, and I did own analogies to make room for these symbols … Michael told me that the design should be mysterious, that people will interpret in their own way …

Pepsi ‘Dreams’

And the BEE

In 1804,the Italian-born Napoleon Bonaparte was crowned Emperor of France in a coronation robe decorated with 300 gold Bees.

Over 300 Golden bees were discovered in 1653 in the tomb of Anton’s 52nd Great Grandfather Childeric I who founded the Merovingian dynasty (Dynastie des Mérovingiens) in 457. They were considered to be the oldest emblem of the sovereigns of France.

Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today’s Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric’s bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric’s bees as symbols of the French Empire.

Napoleon had these 300 golden bees sewn onto his coronation robe—worn when he crowned himself Emperor of France.

In honor of his marriage to the Archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria in April 1810, Napoléon redecorated the Palace of Versailles, placing numerous orders for silk fabrics from Grand-Frères. This fabric sample, from the palace’s great living room, includes his personal emblem, the bee, as well as images related to the glories of the Roman Empire.

http://hartforth.com/bees.html

as a joke

Michael Jackson an the Bee Gess